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Mano-a-Mano

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Do you ever date your children? In other words, do you take your kids out one on one aka mano-a-mono? This week, while my husband  and daughter attended a Dads-Daughter retreat, our son and I spent quality time together. We explored our neighboring community; San Jose, California. While, we were together, I realized there are three things we can do “date” our children.

  1. Be Purposeful – Our busy schedules challenge us to take time to play. We love to do things as a family such as camping, walking, hiking, etc.! So, for me, I must be purposeful in planning time alone time with each of my children. 20160422_182514-1
  2. Let them Pick – As a parent, it’s easy for me to plan my children’s events. This time, I asked Austin, “What would you like to do?” In my mind, I had a specific restaurant I like to frequent. However, I let him choose where we ate. Guess what? He picked the very one I love! Here we are pictured at Kianti’s Italian Restaurant in downtown Santa Cruz, California. The next day, I was thinking of taking Austin fishing at our local lake that opened up after three years of drought. However, he chose to explore my old stomping grounds in San Jose. Unlike me who grew up on a PC, he grew up on Apple products at school and owns an Iphone. He asked is we could tour the Apple campus. Here he is in front of the beautiful building located in Cupertino, California. Although, the offices were closed, to our surprise, their store out front was open. We window shopped and saw their watches, mac books, beats headphones, tv, and souvenirs. 20160423_114812_resized
  3. Be Present – Often, we can get sidetracked by phone calls, e-mails, texts, etc. Austin wanted to play put put golf. While we played, I noticed another mom working on her Ipad the entire time. The saying, “They are only little for a short time” is so true. So, I personally savored every minute with my teenager, because I know in in 5 short years he’ll be off to college! Enjoy your children, because they are a gift from God. – Psalm 127:320160423_131604_resizedDo you take your son or daughter out one on one? If so, I’d love to hear about it! Feel free to share…

Guest Blog by Claire McGarry

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Claire McGarry is a mom of three young children, and the founder of MOSAIC of Faith: a ministry through which she offers evening retreats and monthly faith sharing groups for moms, a children’s service project group, and a weekly mommy-and-me program. She posts weekly at “Shifting My Perspective,” where she writes about how Scripture always challenges her to grow and learn from the issues in her motherhood, and life in general, so she can see the gifts in their hands. You can visit her blog at www.shiftingmyperspective.com. Please welcome Claire!

Blessings, Rebecca

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Rehearsing The Right Response

All scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness so that the man of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work. 2 Timothy 3:16-17

My nine year old son Mason had his first speaking role ever in our church’s Christmas pageant this year. He played Joseph, and had quite a few lines. Having done theatre in college, I know that nervousness can cause your mind to go blank while performing. I explained to Mason that he needed to know his lines forwards and backwards, so no matter how nervous he got, he’d remember what to say and when.

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It occurred to me that I parent my kids the same way I coached Mason for the pageant: making them rehearse the right response to each situation over and over again. Every time any one of them loses their cool, breaks a rule, or is unkind, I have them take some time away to calm down. Then we have a little chat.

First, I ask them to tell me (and not vice versa) what they did wrong. Kids are smart. They know when they’ve misbehaved. My kids don’t need me to point out the error of their ways. Instead, having them put their mistakes into words forces them to take ownership of their actions.

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Second, I have them tell me what an appropriate response would have been. Occasionally I do have to help them brainstorm the different options. But most times they know what the right responses are, sometimes they just choose not to make them. Having them verbalize the different options they could have taken not only reminds them that there are numerous ways to solve any given problem, it also gives them an opportunity to redeem themselves. Not only do they get to rewrite the script of what just happened, they get to see how the new ending plays out so much better than the first.

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Third, not only do they have to apologize to me, but they have to apologize to whomever they hurt in the process. It is important they own their mistakes. However, apologizing is how they make things right.

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Lastly, I have them rehearse the right response. I literally have my kids role-play the scenario leading up to the problem, but then act out the right response instead. They say “practice makes perfect.” It is this process that imprints the right choice on their brains so that, hopefully the next time, when their emotions are running high, they remember what they rehearsed and follow through with a good choice. If I skip this part of the process, my kids are inclined to remember the punishment, not the problem solving and feeling of empowerment that I want them to remember.

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Fortunately Mason was well rehearsed and delivered every one of his lines perfectly. And with each passing year that my kids rehearse the right response, there is less and less fighting in my household, and more overall good behavior. They are so proud of their own practice and progress, and without a doubt, so am I!

How do you teach your child(ren) how to respond to life’s mishaps?

Guest Blog by Tracey Clayton

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As we wrap up 2015, I’d like to wish you and yours happiness in the New Year!

This week, my guest blog writer is Tracey Clayton. She is a full-time mom of three girls. Tracey loves to cook, bake, sew and spend quality time with her daughters. She’s passionate  about writing, and her motto is “Live the life you love, love the life you live.” You can follow her on Facebook. Please welcome Tracey!

Blessings, Rebecca

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Things that the kids can learn from their surroundings

The child’s environment plays an important role in his/her education. Parents should make every effort to ensure that this environment does not bring negative effects to the child, and they must make a great effort to guide their child to the right track.

Parents are the role models

As the child’s immediate environment is the family, it is inevitable that the child takes the characteristics of his/her parents. Therefore, parents should be careful about how they treat their children; it is not strange if children become mean or very aggressive if parents show identical behavior in front of them. Parents need to have a healthy attitude towards a situation that presents itself. If a problem occurs, for example, they must be able to show the resolve or at least seem to have courage to overcome it. As parents are the role models for their children, kids often simply copy the look and behavior.

Peer pressure

Apart from education provided by the parents, the children also receive education in their immediate environment, the most important thing being school. The relationship with teachers and peers has an effect on children’s education. Children often tend to follow what their friends do.

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The importance of games

Play is essential to the child especially in early years. Combining learning and entertainment is an interesting concept involving the game. Through play, the children are not subjected to any pressure and progress at their own pace. It contributes significantly to the motor development in the simplest possible way. This is also a way to develop communication between children and parents. When they play pretend, children understand the world by trying things they have learned and they have seen, and reflecting their impressions. Just looking at my girls play, I could learn a lot about what they feel and think.

Games with rules

At about time they start school, children start to play games governed by rules, which they must comply. This encourages them to use strategies, logic and their moral judgment. Board games, card games and team sports all involve rules. They help children to learn to play in turn, negotiate, solve problems and get along with others.

Useful toys

Toys are an essential part of education, proper development and education in a child’s life. Apart from getting my kids toys that are appropriate for their age and stimulate learning, I also allowed them to play with different household items such as pots and magnets, and I even got them a Zado rug, with alphabet, so that they could subconsciously learn while playing.

The influence of technology

It is certain that the development of technology significantly changed the role of parents. It was really hard for me to comprehend that something that was not part of my growing up, is now an integral part of childhood for my children. However, regardless of all the technological wonders that surround us – the kids are still kids! That is, while kids acquire certain skills through games, mobile phones and computers as they grow up, playing with a ball, riding a bike, and other small, everyday activities, precisely at the appropriate age and in an appropriate manner – will not be able to get compensation later. Your participation as a parent is of paramount importance, much to the benefit and satisfaction of both you and your child.

The positive education demands patience because the child does not adhere very quickly to change. Parents must accompany the children and encourage them, providing everything necessary for the proper development while taking care of children’s immediate surroundings.

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Guest Blog by Stephen Bennett

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First, I’m thrilled to announce I will participate in the Blogs by Christian Women (BCW) First Christmas Blog Tour. My Christmas blog will be featured on Dec 8.  If you’d like to follow our tour, the first stop is with Ally V. on Dec 1.

Second, I’m excited to introduce my guest blogger, Stephen Bennett,  who works as a Data  Scientist and Researcher at Stop Procrastinating, the productivity website. He studied psychology and empirical science, and believes  the vast  information available provides robust and evidence-based findings is of  real use to  fellow web users worldwide. Stephen shares with us his research findings on internet usage for children, and suggests how to best manage it as parents. Please welcome Stephen!

Blessings, Rebecca

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Is the internet a good or a bad influence on children? Used correctly it can help them study and it provides creative and interactive learning resources. However, as many adults know, access to the internet 24/7 can have negative consequences. Distraction frome work and family life, as well as a disturbed night’s sleep if digital devices are used before going to bed.

If the internet can do that to adults, just imagine what the distraction they provide for children. A new study from of 3000 parents by Stop Procrastinating discovered a parent’s fears about the internet. A majority of parents surveyed found that their children were using social media and browsing the web when they should be sleeping and as a consequence it lowered their chances of doing well in school.

Being distracted from sleeping had a major impact the following day at school. The survey found that children were more irritable, less able to concentrate and more tired in the classroom. Parents said that teachers noticed a gradual drop in performance in the classroom as well. Independent research has also found that the grades of children who use the internet too much are lower than those who don’t. It found children with poorest grades at school spent most time on social media websites. Children also learn best by interacting with people not with screens, according to American Academy of Pediatricians.

The survey also found that children are undermining their school work by using social media while doing their homework. Research found that this multi-tasking impairs memory development and reduces concentration.

Luckily, the study also asked parents to reveal the techniques and strategies they use to reduce the negative impacts of social media and the internet on their children. This was especially important as many parents in the study felt disempowered by the prevalence of the internet, believing they had little chance to control their children’s use of it.

The best and most popular strategies were those that combined building up a trusting relationship with their children, so that they were able to have open conversations about the internet without stress and confrontation, and boundary-setting by parents. For instance, stopping children using digital devices an hour before they go to bed. Some parents also tried to make cutting down on internet use an enjoyable and fun challenge that their children could share and compete with their friends by creating a digital detox challenge week.

The survey also found that parents are more successful at cutting their children’s internet use if they work with other parents and the school. If all a group of friends are all treated in the same way they will feel less pressure to break the rules and get online when they shouldn’t.

The survey has been designed into an accessible infographic which details all the findings and help for parents who want to control and reduce their children’s internet use. You can view the infographic below:

 

Guest Blog by Kathleen Crane

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Have you ever struggled getting your toddler to clean up his/her mess? This week, my guest blogger, Kathleen Crane shares her ideas on getting toddlers to clean up their toys.

Kathleen is professionally experienced in the field of home improvement. She loves to write and share her thoughts with the readers. Please welcome Kathleen!

Blessings, Rebecca

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Toy troubles: My Toddler Won’t Help Clean up

Encouraging your toddler to take part in the cleaning process requires more efforts than you can imagine. Normally, toddlers are not keen on arranging of their toys and rooms and that is why parents will meet a lot of difficulties when involving the toddlers in the basic tasks..

Surely, you need to dedicate a lot of your free time if you want to explain to toddlers why they need to clean up after themselves. Starting with the arranging of the toys is the most appropriate decision as kids spend a great part of their time playing with their favourite toys.

If you want to teach the toddlers how to preserve the immaculate condition of their toys for a longer time, you need to keep in mind certain rules. Thanks to this piece of article you will find decision to a wide range of problems that concern the involving of toddlers into some basic household duties, and especially into the activities that include the arranging of the toys.

toddlerHere are some tips from HireHouseCleaners SW9 to take into account:

Set Definite Rules 

No matter how much you want to help the toddlers, let them try to manage with the situation in their own way. If you tell them to pick up the toys and to place them in the basket, instead of leaving them spread around the room, you, make sure that they will understand your request correctly. Do not pick the toys instead of them and do not pretend that nothing has happened. Being positive is a good thing, but toddlers need to understand from an early age that it is up to them to keep their toys clean and unbroken.

Encourage The Toddlers To Help With the Cleaning of The Toys

As you can imagine, toddlers won’t be able to provide perfect cleaning of the toys but they can at least help you in this activity. Explain them that toys should be cleaned on a regular basis and that they should give you a helping hand because it comes to their own toys. Most of the toys could be effectively cleaned with a clean cloth and with a solution of warm water and some liquid soap. Demonstrate the toddlers how they can provide a simple cleaning – you will be amazed how well they will cope with the task as long as you are patient enough to explain them everything in details.

Be Ready For Compromises 

Toddlers do not like being told what to do and they will probably accept the new rules as a challenge. Unfortunately they usually try to oppose to your opinion so you need to be ready for certain compromises. For instance, in case the toddler refuses to clean the toys, you can at least teach him how to arrange the toys in the basket in a more interesting way. Take it slowly and you will see that toddlers will gradually accept most of the new rules that concern them.

Regardless of the cleaning rules that you apply, do not forget that your approach is very essential. You need to have a strong bond with the toddlers, otherwise you won’t succeed in teaching them of some basic habits. Be patient and tolerant and start with simple cleaning task. Make sure that you praise the toddlers for their efforts and that you communicate with them in a calm way. Educating children is certainly a difficult task but when you are determined to accept the challenge, you will be able to teach the kids how to be more organized and responsible towards their duties.

Harvest Family Tradition

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Holiday traditions are fun and important. In fact, Marriage and Family research shows, that  “Traditions are the cement that keeps the family together . . . and help you withstand the storms that come.”

One of our harvest time family traditions is to visit a pumpkin patch, pick a pumpkin, and bring it home to carve it.

It’s fun to go to a farm and look for the perfect pumpkin. I wonder, Will it be big, medium or small? Will it be green, white or orange in color? Will we free hand our design and rough cut it with a table knife or will we use special stencils and delicate carving tools?

It delights my heart, as a parent, to watch my children squeal with delight as they make many choices such as where to place our pumpkin. Do we put it on the porch or do we perch it on the windowsill?

When our kids were younger, we hosted annual pumpkin carving contests in our backyard. We’d invite friends and family to join us, and it was a blast to see how everyone’s pumpkin came out.

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We’d set up tables with newspaper to catch all the leftover pulp, and place pumpkin carving utensils/stencils out.

Our family also collects pumpkin seeds, sprinkles salt, and bakes them at 300F for approximately 45 minutes or until brown. Yum!

Here’s a picture of this year’s blank canvas. I can’t wait to see to see how it turns out! Each year offers something new and exciting.pumpkin

What is your family tradition during the harvest season? Does your children’s school or church group host an annual harvest festival? Do you go on any special field trips? I’d love to hear your thoughts/suggestions. Feel free to comment below.

Ticking Time Bomb

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Last week, Ahmed Mohammed was arrested in Texas for bringing a clock to school which he allegedly made. Authorities arrested the teen for possession of a hoax bomb.

Later, Richard Dawkins posted on Facebook that the teenager didn’t event build it, but wanted authorities to incarcerate him.

All the news surrounding this incident is making my head spin as a parent. First, I heard on the radio, he was severely shunned. Then, he was praised for his ingenuity and invited to many companies’ science and technical fairs.

As a results of similar past incidences, my own two children don’t have lockers on their public school campus. I remember how fun it was to have my very own locker in middle and high school where I could store my books between classes along with my personal items.

Nowadays, due to bomb threats, knives, guns etc. most schools do not have storage lockers for kids. Sadly, they are forced to carry outrageously heavy backpacks.

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What are your thoughts on this controversial subject?

Sharing is Caring

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Thank you for sharing. It shows me you are caring are the lyrics to a song we sing in pre-school. Yet, it’s my observation kids’ least favorite activity is sharing toys. It’s my experience that children will inevitably want the same toy to play with at the same exact time. The rule at our school is to ask your friend, “Can I be next?” Then the other child will respond, “Yes,” play for awhile and hand over the item. However, there are times when a child will respond, “No!”

Why is it so hard to share? Like when you are savouring a delicious meal and your spouse asks, “Can I have a bite?” Of course you give them some, but deep down you may be thinking, “No!”

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Sharing appears to be a learned behavior varying from culture to culture. Some people share everything with others such as their money, time, house, car, clothes, food, etc.

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I believe the ultimate act of sharing is when God gave His one and only begotten son, Jesus, to be a randsome for the world’s sin. Often, I look at my thirteen-year-old son,  and am reminded of His loving sacrifice.

How do you share or teach your children to share? Or has anyone shared something special with you? Please tell us below.

Guest Blog by Eileen Turay

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I’d like to introduce Eileen Turay. She has a Masters of Science in Counseling with a school specialization. She’s worked with children with Autism for a few years using ABA (Applied Behavior Analysis), and taught at both preschool and elementary levels. She’s married, has a three-year-old daughter, two dogs, and they live in South Florida.

She shares some great free and cheap ideas to do with children. Please welcome Eileen Turay!

Blessings, Rebecca

Our top 8 fave FREE and CHEAP things to do with Kids

Since I currently work full time, I am always looking for new fun things for Olivia and I to do on the weekends. Though going to get Bagels and Starbucks are among our top two faves, they get old quickly; so, I thought I would make a list of some of our favorite inexpensive and free things that Olivia and I like to do together.

1. Make breakfast together. Pancakes are not only pretty simple to make, they are easy for a three-year-old to help make. Liv loves nothing more than to stir up the batter. I know, it can get messy, but it is worth it. When she feels helpful, it makes us both happy. Then we sit on the couch in our jammies and yell at the dogs together for trying to eat our food.

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Eating breakfast together. parenting fun

 2. Go to a new park. HYPE IT UP! When I ask if Olivia wants to go to the park, I never know what she is going to say; but if I ask her if she wants to try a BRAND NEW AMAZING SUPER AWESOME park, she is IN! Google parks in a 30 mile radius from your house. If you see graffiti, gang signs, and broken glass you may want to try another one… but that’s the fun in the adventure right?

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Fun at the Park

3. Festivals. Greek, music, dog, school, asparagus (yep.. that’s a real one in Stockton, CA lol) Look them up and go!! You may have to argue with your child a bit about why $5 a ticket for the bounce house is not happening… but you can probably distract her with a sweet swag bag compliments of the local Bank Branch booth.

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Fun and Free Festivals

 4. FORTS. I cannot stress how amazing forts are. From ages 2-34 (my husband as proof), forts can be lots of fun. You have to be willing to just say goodbye to any chance of having decent couch cushions ever again; but honestly, if you have a three-year-old, you’ve already had the sofa funeral.

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Fort Fun. Making a Mess

5. Anything wet. If you have the space for it, a tiny pool or water table. If you live in an apartment like us, find the nearest spray ground/beach/lake/pool. This one is a given. Olivia almost always says she doesn’t want to go; then she always has a blast. Here is the trick: you need to get wet too. I don’t know why I am sharing this or why it is such a stand out memory to me: but as a child, my mom never wanted to swim with us. We swam at my grandparents’ pool all the time and she NEVER got into a bathing suit to swim with us. Dad? always down… but mom was never a fan of water/swimming. I STILL remember like yesterday when one of the other adults pushed her into the pool one time with all of us with all her clothes on. I know she was mad at first but she ended up laughing. I thought it was the MOST FUN swim day we ever had as kids. It is such a simple thing, but your kid does NOT care what you look like in a bathing suit. She just wants you to be part of the fun. So be a part of it. She will remember. I still do.

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Free and Fun Things to do, Water Fountain 

6. Picnics. Eating a PBJ in your house=lame. Eating a PBJ on a blanket or picnic table anywhere else=awesome. For some reason, doing things like eating sandwiches at novel locations always seems to be a good time.

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Fun, Free Picnic.

 

7. Crafting. We live in FL so we are not short of Coconuts to paint. If you live somewhere where pinecones or large rocks inhabit, paint those. If big leaves are all you have to work with, use those. Its innate in children to pick up/collect/borderline hoard things they find in nature every day. If I had a rock for every time Olivia collected a stick…. oh yah, I do… and there are a lot. If you don’t want to buy paint, use what you have. Glue and ripped paper is a great time 🙂

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8. READ. People are amazed at Olivia’s vocabulary everywhere we go. I can honestly say that her intelligence is highly attributed to the amount of books we read together. We have read to her at night time since she was a tiny baby. She barely sat still for the longest time. At some point, however, she began to go from “fidgety toddler who barely made it through one story” to “mommy you skipped a page” (I swear I didn’t mean to… ok I did… but now she catches me so I had to stop). If you don’t always remember to read to your child, it’s ok! If you don’t have the time to do it at night, make it. I promise you, the bonding that comes from routine reading time is immeasurable. It is one of our favorite things to do.

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Reading to your Kids

 Spend time not money.

Visit our website at www.livandleen.com for more parenting tips and tricks, and learn from my mistakes before you make your own.

A special thanks to Rebecca for letting us into your community. It’s always better when we Liv and Leen totegher J

Eileen Turay

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Here are some other ideas for fun stuff to do with your kids:  Fun Stuff

PS. Benjamin Bunnie’s Big Adventure is now available in paperback!

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Guest Blog from Catherine McMullen

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Catherin hales from Davison, Michigan. She’s worked in early childhood education for 16 years; the last 9 at  Head Start agency. She worked her way up from a Lead Teacher to a Home Visitor and now an Education Coordinator. She enjoys reading and writing in her spare time. She has a three -year-old Boston Terrier named Jagger. She is also an avid runner! She’s included some helpful parenting links for you at the end of her blog. Please welcome Catherine McMullen!

Blessings, Rebecca

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Parent/Child insight-Catherine McMullen

First I think it is important to note that parental insight differs, sometimes greatly from child insight. Naturally parents see or internalize situations from a different perspective than children. So, that makes it easy to understand why these two parties are usually at opposite ends. However, closing this gap as much as we can will strengthen the parent-child relationship, further supporting a positive bond between the two.

This subject was a topic of conversation for me this past weekend. Over a lunch with a good friend of mine who also works in the field of education with me. We discussed a recent child’s birthday party that I attended.

I recalled how much fun it was. I mean the parent’s had it on a sunny and hot Saturday in July. It was perfect! It was so beautiful outside. They had the pool open and clean, filled with toys and kids! We grilled out with yummy food. Everybody seemed happy visiting and socializing. I remember thinking, Wow this mom and dad really put a lot of thought, energy, and work into making this a great day.  This is an act of love for sure. The birthday boy was turning nine He had a blast playing with his friends in his pool! He seemed to be having a great day, a spectacular birthday party filled with love and excitement.

Keep this in mind: when I first arrived a young boy who was already in the pool sprayed unsuspecting victims with a squirt gun. This is unsurprising child play, right?!! Yes, but to those who did not want to get wet, it was not seen as fun nor welcoming.

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So back to the party. It was now toward the end of my venture at this wild and crazy party. I was standing outside of the pool area preparing to say, “Goodbye” When out of the pool came that little trigger happy boy. He was tattling on the birthday boy. It seemed has if he was having a change of heart about that fun pool play. Now, I am not exact on what he tattled or what the birthday boy may or may not have done. It doesn’t matter.

This is where parental insight needs to try all it’s might and match the child’s insight.

The mom, like many, walked over to the pool. I’m sure had a discussion with him about the accusations, and met with opposition. Not surprising! He’s a 9 year-old boy, who was surrounded by friends and fun.

I am not sure how he displayed his opposition. That doesn’t matter either.

What does matter is to know and keep in the forefront of our minds that parental reaction or “insight” into a situation, is so much more advanced. We, as adults, have the luxury of being able to use our developed brain and think through problems and situations before we respond.

This doesn’t happen enough.

Instead of taking the time to fully and appropriately understand the birthday boy’s perspective on the situation, his mom engaged in the infamous power struggle. She pulled him out of the water, forcefully pushed him to sit in an outlying lawn chair, and continued to yell her frustrations at him.

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This is a classic example of how the gap between parent and child insight can directly lead to the malfuncion and deterioration of discipline and other strategies are used. This is what my point was while discussing this over lunch. The differing of insights on this particular situation allowed for an ineffective discipline method.

The child’s brain is not as mature as adult’s. They are emotional creatures meaning, and tend to be run by their feelings. They cannot easily detach as we can from an emotional situation and gain logical perspective. We, as adults, are more able to know if we are heading into a power struggle we can make choices to step away from the situation to gain some distance to allow our rational thinking to kick in.

In my line of work I see many parents unable to do this or simply not taking the time to process situations this way to gain the proper insight. Which leads to ineffective strategies and frustrations on all parenting fronts.

So, she saw this as removing him from a situation where he was misbehaving (or was he defending himself?) by taking him to a secluded place to get her point across.

However, a further differing insight of this situation was, she pulled him out of the pool in front of all his friends, grabbed his arm pushing him across the yard further humiliating him for everybody to see, and then continued to disrespect him by yelling her words at him.

I’m sure in the heat of the moment, she didn’t see it at all this way. In her mind, she’s solving a problem. But,in the birthday boy’s mind, further problems were being made.

These different perspectives are not conducive for parent-child relationships. Children do not learn anything from this situation, because they stay in the emotional part of their brain, which does not allow for proper and successful processing to further allow meaningful learning from the situation.

This shows us how important it is for us as adults to detach from emotional power struggles with children, in order to close the gap between the two insights to progress in positive and meaningful relationships.

http://consciousdiscipline.com/about/conscious-discipline-for-parents.asp

http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/family/docs/parent-child-relationships.pdf

http://childdevelopmentinfo.com/child-development/erickson/

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