Tag Archive | love

Guest Blog by Shannon Clark & Angels Above Book

blessed1.jpg (2000×1999)
When Shannon’s publicist approached me to review her new book, Angels Above, I was excited as it is an innovative product! When I received my copy, it took my breath away. I thought Wow, this is amazing! I can see people giving Angels Above gift set as baby shower, baptismal, Easter, birthday or Christmas presents.
 I especially appreciate that a portion of the proceeds go to feed children.
About the Book 
A story about angels on a mission to spread love and share positive messages with children everywhere. This book set is a fun new approach to helping guide children throughout life. There are so many creative ways the messages can be delivered with the help of your Angel Friend.
About the Author
Shannon Clark, is a graduate of the University of Kentucky, earned a bachelor’s degree in Business Marketing. Currently a free-lance writer, she enjoys spending time with her family and friends. Shannon lives in Kentucky with her husband and two children.
Please welcome Shannon!
Blessings, Rebecca
cropped-picture
Definition of Parenting
 Having children of your own will keep you honest. Believe me, they know more than one might think. Whether it’s being reminded about missing church while on vacation, skipping bath night or forgetting to read this week’s library book, my children don’t hesitate to let me know when things don’t go as planned. I guess that is a good sign that we get it right most of the time.
It’s interesting how my view of parenting has changed over the years. The simple definition of “parenting” according to Merriam Webster Dictionary: the process of taking care  of children until they are old enough to take care of themselves: the things that parents do to raise a child. This sounds pretty straight-forward, right? This was my assumption growing up, as I watched screaming kids in the grocery store aisle in disbelief that the parents couldn’t control their children. Now, I’m the mom that races around the store trying to get everything before my two year old is finished eating the free bakery cookie. Whew! I’m pretty sure the Webster Dictionary decided it would be easier to stop with: the things that parents do to raise a child. As if the daily tasks weren’t enough, parents have an even greater responsibility of imparting values and morals to their children.
As a parent, I want to inspire in my children love, faith, devotion and confidence so that they can take it upon themselves to go out and succeed in their own endeavors one day. I hope and pray for their happiness and that they will lead and inspire others while demonstrating self-responsibility, courage and poise. Ben Franklin once said the following: “Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.” These kids DO learn by example. Instead of only telling or teaching our children to help others, sign up as family to help serve meals at a shelter this Thanksgiving. Instead of only telling or teaching children to be kind, make cards this Christmas to share with people in the nursing home or hospital. Instead of only telling or teaching your children about Christ, put him at the center of everything you do. If they are going to be like me, God, please give me the strength to be like YOU! When Christ is in your heart, there is no limit to how bright your light will shine!
Disclaimer: No compensation was received for this book review and/or guest blog. Just passing along a good read.
Advertisements

Unconditional Love

1043877_4311134794973_806469628_n

I watched the nurse serve my then twenty-two-month-old son a purple solution. His body slowly slumped in her arms, and she whisked him to the Operating Room. Fear crept in my head as I waited patiently. I understood hernia surgeries to be common place, however, hospital statistics did nothing to calm my nerves. This is my precious boy; my firstborn.

My husband put his arm around me, “Austin will be fine. He’s in good hands.”

I squeezed him, “I know. I just love our boy so much, and it pains me to see our toddler undergo surgery. I wish I could take his place.”

While I paced, I reflected on my understanding of love. After all, I married my best friend just three short years earlier. I enjoy watching our wedding video. It never fails, a lump forms in my throat each time I see Randy wipe a single tear off my cheek during our nuptials.  Yet, this time, the love I felt differed. I ached.

It began two months prior, Randy called me into Austin’s bedroom. “Come here Hon, there’s a bump popping out his stomach when he pushes. Look!”

I gasped, “What’s that?”

“I’m not sure. Pack his bag. We’re taking him to the ER!”

I kept calm as to not scare our little guy, dressed him and rushed to the hospital. Upon our arrival, the staff immediately wheeled him into an examination room.  The doctor asked us some routine questions, and pressed on his bulge. He explained, “Austin has a hernia. It’s typical for children his age. I’ll have my nurse schedule a simple surgical procedure repair the hole. The wait is approximately three months out. Don’t worry. We perform over 400 surgeries per year.” What, his intestines are popping out and of his muscle lining and we have to wait three months!  He continued, “If the hernia doesn’t retract for some reason, then return for emergency surgery.”

I looked at Randy, “Why doesn’t the parenting handbook cover these issues for first time parents?”

He chuckled and pulled me close, “We’ll learn together.”

Ninety days passed, and his surgery day arrived.

Approximately an hour later, Austin’s surgeon entered the waiting room, “The operation was a success, and Austin is fine.”

Inexplicable joy filled me. I exhaled, “Thank you doctor. When can I see him?”

His nurse escorted me to my son’s recovery room. I glanced at my baby rattling the crib rails with all his might, and jumping up and down. His red, sweaty face screamed, “Mommy! I want my Mommy!”  I felt as if someone had opened my chest cavity, and ripped my heart out. I believe Austin waking up in an unfamiliar environment with strange people, tubes taped to him, and the absence of his parents frightened him.

I gathered him in my arms, and held him tight. I sunk into a rocking chair, kissed him, and whispered, “It’s okay Austin. Mommy is here.” He buried his little head between my neck and shoulder, and fell asleep. At that moment, I knew unconditional love. It’s a sacrificial compassion for someone other than me, and it’s even sweeter when reciprocated. As I recount this incident, I’m reminded that Austin’s surgery hurt me more than it did him. I don’t understand why so many boys and girls must undergo hernias, but I’ve certainly developed more awareness and empathy for sick children.

Coincidentally, that same summer my father’s was diagnosed with a similar hernia; only it took my dad six months to heal due to his surgery being more evasive.

On our ride home, I watched Austin slumber, and I realized the bond between a mother and her child is very strong. It’s truly unconditional love! I believe it’s one of life’s beautiful mysteries.

Have you ever experienced Aha moment of unconditional love? If so, I’d love to hear about it.

Blessings, Rebecca

PS I joined Top 25 Mommy Blogs! If you have enjoyed our blogs, please vote for me by clicking their emblem on my home page. Thank you!

cover-imageIntroducing my new book, Benjamin Bunnie’s Big Adventure! Now available at Amazon.com.